REPORT: Comparative study on the distribution of value in European chocolate chains

REPORT: Comparative study on the distribution of value in European chocolate chains

FAO and BASIC. 2020. Comparative study on the distribution of value in European chocolate chains. Paris. DOI link. 234 pages

This study by the Food and Agriculture Organization and the Bureau d’analyse sociétale pour une

information citoyenne (BASIC) explores the distribution of value and costs along cocoa and chocolate supply chains. With a focus on the French market of dark and milk chocolate, confectionery bars and breakfast cocoa powder, it analyses cocoa grown in four producer countries: Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Ecuador and Cameroon.

Principally the report aims to estimate the distribution of value, costs and profits for different chocolate products from cocoa farmers to consumers and explore the influencing factors. It also compares the value accrued by farmers for the different products. Its main findings are that 70% of the total value are accrued by brands and retailers, the final two actors in the chain. At the opposite end of the chain, 18.6% of total value is accrued in cocoa producing countries.

Comparative study on the distribution of value in European chocolate chains (Executive summary)

Comparative study on the distribution of value in European chocolate chains (Full report)

Related:
22/09 WEBINAR. EU MULTI-STAKEHOLDER DIALOGUE FOR SUSTAINABLE COCOA.

In the context of the European Commission’s political priorities including the European Green Deal and a zero tolerance approach on child labour, the Commission will initiate an informal dialogue in support of a sustainable cocoa sector. 


It will build upon the initiative of the two main producing countries, Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana, existing initiatives of EU Member States, third countries, and international organisations. Considering the role of the EU as policy and global standard setter, the objective of the dialogue is to support the elimination of child labour and child trafficking, the protection and restorations of forests, and to ensure a living income for cocoa farmers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Contact us
If you are interested or have any questions, send us a message.
I am very interested
Send Message